Indian country – Lumbee Tribe http://lumbee-tribe.org/ Sat, 04 Dec 2021 05:10:45 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://lumbee-tribe.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-9-120x120.png Indian country – Lumbee Tribe http://lumbee-tribe.org/ 32 32 Tribal homelands bill back on the agenda in “new era” of relations with Indian countries https://lumbee-tribe.org/tribal-homelands-bill-back-on-the-agenda-in-new-era-of-relations-with-indian-countries/ Wed, 01 Dec 2021 06:34:46 +0000 https://lumbee-tribe.org/tribal-homelands-bill-back-on-the-agenda-in-new-era-of-relations-with-indian-countries/ ‘My Land, My Future’: Indigenous youth take part in a tribal homelands rally at the United States Capitol on November 14, 2018. Photo by Indianz.Com (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0) WASHINGTON, DC – Lawmakers are set to approve yet another round of Indian country bills, including a long-awaited but controversial measure that will help tribes restore their […]]]>

‘My Land, My Future’: Indigenous youth take part in a tribal homelands rally at the United States Capitol on November 14, 2018. Photo by Indianz.Com (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)

WASHINGTON, DC – Lawmakers are set to approve yet another round of Indian country bills, including a long-awaited but controversial measure that will help tribes restore their homeland.

Four bills of interest will be considered in the US House of Representatives starting Wednesday, according to the majority leader’s schedule. Everything will be dealt with under a rule suspension, a process typically used for legislation that is expected to pass the chamber with bipartisan support.

But the last time the Tribal Homes Bill was put to a vote more than two years ago, the situation was hardly cheerful. That’s because former President Donald Trump – using language widely condemned as racist – encouraged his fellow Republicans to vote against the measure, as well as another who benefited a tribe whose efforts have been championed by the target of his misogynist attack.

https://www.indianz.com/News/2021/11/30/tribal-homelands-bill-back-on-agenda-in-new-era-of-indian-country-relations/


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Native American author reflects on important issues for Indian country | New https://lumbee-tribe.org/native-american-author-reflects-on-important-issues-for-indian-country-new/ Fri, 26 Nov 2021 20:00:00 +0000 https://lumbee-tribe.org/native-american-author-reflects-on-important-issues-for-indian-country-new/ Country united states of americaUS Virgin IslandsMinor Outlying Islands of the United StatesCanadaMexico, United Mexican StatesBahamas, Commonwealth ofCuba, Republic ofDominican RepublicHaiti, Republic ofJamaicaAfghanistanAlbania, People’s Socialist Republic ofAlgeria, People’s Democratic Republic ofAmerican SamoaAndorra, Principality ofAngola, Republic ofAnguillaAntarctica (the territory south of 60 degrees S)Antigua and BarbudaArgentina, Argentine RepublicArmeniaArubaAustralia, Commonwealth ofAustria, Republic ofAzerbaijan, Republic ofBahrain, Kingdom ofBangladesh, […]]]>


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Biden pledges to improve security in Indian country https://lumbee-tribe.org/biden-pledges-to-improve-security-in-indian-country/ Tue, 16 Nov 2021 12:09:57 +0000 https://lumbee-tribe.org/biden-pledges-to-improve-security-in-indian-country/ President Joe Biden on Monday pledged to make the Indian country safer and ordered his top officials to tackle the national crisis of missing and murdered indigenous peoples. The president signed an executive order that gives federal officials eight months to develop a comprehensive strategy to prevent and address the high rates of violence that […]]]>


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Here’s what’s happening in the Indian country: October 22-29 https://lumbee-tribe.org/heres-whats-happening-in-the-indian-country-october-22-29/ Fri, 22 Oct 2021 22:08:43 +0000 https://lumbee-tribe.org/heres-whats-happening-in-the-indian-country-october-22-29/ Details Through Tamara Ikenberg 22 October 2021 This weekend and next week, fascinating expressions of the past and present are popping up all over Indian country. Attractions include the life of a Cherokee legend in music, a performance by a rising star of the Indiqueer soundstage, and a grand celebration of Buffalo Back. Tune Indigenous […]]]>

This weekend and next week, fascinating expressions of the past and present are popping up all over Indian country. Attractions include the life of a Cherokee legend in music, a performance by a rising star of the Indiqueer soundstage, and a grand celebration of Buffalo Back.

Tune Indigenous News OnlineThe event guide for getting into the cultural groove without missing a beat.

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A special event celebrating the bison's return to the Rocky Boy Preserve will take place on Tuesday, October 26 at the Chippewa Cree Tribal Buffalo Pasture near Box Elder, MT.  (Photo / Rocky Boy Buffalo Project)The return…

WHEN: Tuesday October 26, 9 a.m.

OR: The Chippewa Cree Tribal Buffalo Pasture, Main St. W Hwy 448, Box Elder, MT; Event page

After more than 30 years, the bison are returning to the Rocky Boy reserve.

Over the past two years, Rocky Boy Sustainability Coordinator Jason Belcourt and his dedicated seven-member board of directors have raised funds and worked to make animals essential to the spirit and sustenance of the tribes. from the Plains to Rocky Boy, a Chippewa Cree reservation in north-central Montana. .

On Tuesday, 11 buffaloes provided by the American Prairie Reserve and Confederate Salish and Kootenai Tribes will be greeted with traditional songs and dances, a tipi lift, a pipe ceremony and a community meal.

While Belcourt and his board did the heavy lifting to ensure the return, Belcourt ultimately credits the triumph to the animals themselves.

“This is a historic moment. It’s a big deal and we look forward to some really good things to come with the bison, ”Belcourt said. “I didn’t take this fight. The buffalo did it. The buffalo chose each of us to choose this fight on his behalf. He booms and he comes back.

To verify Indigenous News Online next week for a full story on the return of the buffalo to Rocky Boy.

A scene from the musical Nanyehi: Beloved Woman of the Cherokee, which premieres Friday October 29 and Saturday October 30 at Hard Rock Live in Catoosa, OK.  (Photo / Nanyehi Facebook page)Nanyehi – The Story of Nancy Ward

WHEN: Friday October 29 and Saturday October 30 at 7:30 p.m.

OR: Hard Rock Live, 777 Cherokee St., Catoosa, OK; Tickets cost $ 15 for general admission and $ 10 for Cherokee citizens and children under 12. here or dial 918-314-ROCK; Nanyehi’s Facebook page

Woman warrior and peacemaker, Nanyehi is a Cherokee legend.

Also referred to as Nancy Ward, the fearless and revered figure known as the last ghigou Cherokee – which translates to “beloved woman” or “woman of war” – fiercely defended her people in the campaign against the Creek Nation and is became a powerful peacemaker during the American Revolution.

Throughout her life, Nayehi has used her influential position to champion the contributions and value of women from all cultures.

“May the sons of your wives be ours; our sons are yours. Let your wives hear our words, ”Ward told American treaty commissioners in a speech in 1781.

The story of Ward, who lived from 1738 to 1822, was either totally unknown to the general public, or at most a historical footnote in great need of fleshing out, until 2013 when the premiere of the revealing musical Nanyehi-The Story of Nancy Ward.

Written by Nick Sweet and Becky Hobbs, Ward’s fifth great-granddaughter, the musical expresses Ward’s life in two acts and seventeen emotional original songs, some of which incorporate the Cherokee language.

“I was motivated by something so much bigger than me to tell this story,” Hobbs told Oklahoma’s Examiner-Company newspaper. “I prayed a lot to follow his wishes in telling his story. His story is very important in today’s world because we have to stop killing each other, we all share the same planet.

As a child, Hobbs heard about Nanyehi from his mother. In the history of the Examiner-Company, Hobbs said one of the stories she remembered the most was how Nanyehi helped the Cherokee triumph in the Battle of Taliwa in 1755 after picking up the rifle of her husband Kingfisher, who was shot down during the battle. Hobbs added that Nanyehi was known to chew on Kingfisher’s lead bullets to make them more deadly.

Hobbs’ musical homage to his ingenious and inspired ancestor has received widespread critical acclaim since its premiere.

Alice Reese of The Harold-Banner in Greenville, Texas called it “An exciting epic of war and peace (which) ranges from merry stickball games to hard and bloody battles and romance to tragedy.” Using voices and drums evocative of Native American culture as well as the folk music and ballads of early American settlers, the composition by composer, playwright and musical director Becky Hobbs presents Nanyehi’s remarkable life in a stunning musical drama.

Singer-songwriter Kwakwaka'wakw / Cree Nimkish will perform in a non-stop concert presented by the imagineNative Film + Media Arts Festival on Saturday, October 23.  (Photo / Nimkish Facebook page)The Beat with DJ Shub, Nimkish and Indigo

WHEN: Saturday 23 October, 9 p.m.

OR: Diffusion. Tickets cost $ 10. To buy here.

“Young, sick, broke, I need healing / I have problems piled on the ceiling.”

Vancouver Kwakwaka’wakw / Cree musician and poet Nimkish admits problems in the song BSJ. Named candidate for the best songs of summer 2021 by Radio-Canada Music , the hypnotic and revealing track from her current album “Damage Control,” which documents coping mechanisms in the era of the pandemic, has helped position Nimkish as one of the hottest properties among a growing movement of Indicate performers whose sound fusion of indigenous and intimately unconventional identities cross sound and cultural barriers.

Nimkish explained the meaning of YSB in a press release.

“(YSB) is about feeling like you can’t move forward and solving specific issues that we as indigenous women work on on a daily basis,” she said. “Our generation has had to deal with trauma and we continually fight for fairness. It can seem exhausting to constantly try to be truly heard.”

Nimkish’s powerful voice and his trippy, layered tracks will be heard loud and clear during The Beat streaming concert, part of the imagineNative Film + Media Arts festival, which runs both online and in person through Sunday. October 24.

The online show also stars the Métis singer Indigo and mohawk artist DJ Shub, known as the Godfather of Pow Wow Step, a blend of native music, electro and club beats.

For more information on the imagineNative Film + Media festival, visit festival.imaginenative.org.

Honkv Storytelling

WHEN: Saturday 23 October, 6.30 p.m.

OR: Claude Cox Omniplex, 2950 Warrior Rd., Okmulgee, Oklahoma; Event page

Who is afraid of Honkv?

The Honkv is a bogeyman or monster in the Muscogee Creek tongue. As a prelude to Halloween, Muscogee Nation Museum, Cultural Center and Archives invites community members to tell their scariest Honkv stories under the stars.

Storytellers and listeners are invited to gather outside under the pavilion of the Claude Cox omniplex to share creepy stories and simultaneously devour popcorn, food and drink provided by 5C Kettle. and the Mvskoke Lady Legends.

The chills and chills are free, so bring your best stories and perfect the Muscogee Halloween lingo with the video below.

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Indigenous perspective. Indigenous voices. Native News.

we launched Indigenous News Online because the mainstream media often overlooks the news that is important, it is aboriginal people. We believe that everyone in the Indian country deserves equal access to news and commentary concerning them, their loved ones and their communities. That’s why the story you just completed was free and we want it to stay that way for all readers. We hope you will consider making a donation to support our efforts so that we can continue to publish more stories that make a difference to Indigenous people, whether they live on or off reserve. Your donation will help us continue to produce quality journalism and raise Indigenous voices. Any contribution of any amount, big or small, gives us a better and stronger future and allows us to remain a force for change. Donate to Native News Online today and support independent Indigenous journalism. Thank you.

About the Author

Tamara Ikenberg

Author: Tamara Ikenberg

Tamara Ikenberg is a Native News Online contributor. It covers the tribes of the southwest as well as native arts, culture and entertainment. She can be reached at [email protected]



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Daines Fight for Indian Country of Montana, Urges Treasury Secretary to Establish Office of Tribal Affairs | New https://lumbee-tribe.org/daines-fight-for-indian-country-of-montana-urges-treasury-secretary-to-establish-office-of-tribal-affairs-new/ Thu, 07 Oct 2021 16:40:00 +0000 https://lumbee-tribe.org/daines-fight-for-indian-country-of-montana-urges-treasury-secretary-to-establish-office-of-tribal-affairs-new/ US SENATE – US Senator Steve Daines joined a group of bipartisan senators to urge US Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen to establish an office of tribal affairs to strengthen the ministry’s relationship with the tribal nations of Montana and to provide more internal expertise on issues affecting the Indian country. . “Recent consultations and tribal […]]]>

US SENATE – US Senator Steve Daines joined a group of bipartisan senators to urge US Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen to establish an office of tribal affairs to strengthen the ministry’s relationship with the tribal nations of Montana and to provide more internal expertise on issues affecting the Indian country. .

“Recent consultations and tribal interactions between the Treasury and tribal nations underscore the need for sufficient and dedicated internal expertise in the Treasury on issues of tribal policy. The establishment of such an office enjoys the support of the Indian country and would improve the ability of the Treasury to fulfill its trust responsibilities to respect the nation-to-nation relationship between the federal government and the tribal nations, ”Yellen said in a letter.

The Treasury has long played a role in matters, including fiscal and financial matters, which have severely affected the welfare and sovereignty of some tribal nations. This role has grown over time and has become extremely important during the COVID-19 pandemic as Congress entrusted the Treasury with the crucial responsibility of providing tribal nations with billions of dollars in relief funds. The Internal Revenue Service, the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency, the Community Development Financial Institutions Program, and the Office of Recovery Programs are just a few of the parts of the treasury that make decisions that have a huge impact on nations. tribals on COVID-19 aid implementation, tribal economic development, taxation and tax incentives, financing and capital needs, trade policy, etc.


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Creative new initiative to tackle opioid epidemic in Indian country launches this week https://lumbee-tribe.org/creative-new-initiative-to-tackle-opioid-epidemic-in-indian-country-launches-this-week/ Thu, 07 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://lumbee-tribe.org/creative-new-initiative-to-tackle-opioid-epidemic-in-indian-country-launches-this-week/ Skyhawk Reborn is printed in three languages: English, Lakota, and (soon) Dakota, with the goal of helping tribes revitalize their native languages. RAPID CITY, SD – A new initiative to tackle the opioid epidemic in tribal communities is launched this week in South Dakota. The Great Plains Tribal Leaders Health Board received a grant to […]]]>
Skyhawk Reborn is printed in three languages: English, Lakota, and (soon) Dakota, with the goal of helping tribes revitalize their native languages.

RAPID CITY, SD – A new initiative to tackle the opioid epidemic in tribal communities is launched this week in South Dakota.

The Great Plains Tribal Leaders Health Board received a grant to fund an opioid response program to provide prevention, treatment and recovery support services.

They’ve coordinated with a communications company to produce the “Skyhawk Reborn” comic book series, which focuses on opioid abuse and abuse. Great Plains wanted to find a creative way to involve and educate young people in Indian country.

“So our grant is for all people aged 10 and over – and of course you know they say the earlier you can start educating young the better,” says Staci Eagle Elk, Head of Great Plains Tribal Opioid Response Program.

Skyhawk Reborn is a fully animated digital and print comic book series that uses indigenous culture and tradition to connect with readers. The cultural element is something that Eagle Elk believes is key to reaching its intended audience, and that’s why Skyhawk Reborn is printed in three languages: English, Lakota, and soon – Dakota.

“We say, ‘we are proof of the prayers of our ancestors’… we are also proof of their resilience and determination to survive,” says Eagle Elk. “That’s kind of the premise that we used, you know, their prayers… cultural traditions and their return and how those traditions can save our communities and tribal individuals today. “

Skyhawk Reborn will premiere at 2 p.m. on Friday, October 8 on Great Plains Tribal Leaders Health Board Facebook page.

CLICK HERE for more information on the board and their efforts.


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Here’s what’s happening in the Indian country: October 1 https://lumbee-tribe.org/heres-whats-happening-in-the-indian-country-october-1/ Thu, 30 Sep 2021 22:33:54 +0000 https://lumbee-tribe.org/heres-whats-happening-in-the-indian-country-october-1/ Details Through Tamara Ikenberg September 30, 2021 Indian Country takes off, stage and taste buds for a week of events that will seduce all the senses. Unmissable moments include a concert where recording superstars will use their music to advance Indigenous education, a vivid exploration of indigeness, a tasty celebration of Indian taco, and a […]]]>

Indian Country takes off, stage and taste buds for a week of events that will seduce all the senses.

Unmissable moments include a concert where recording superstars will use their music to advance Indigenous education, a vivid exploration of indigeness, a tasty celebration of Indian taco, and a high-flying tribute to culture. Pueblo.

Want more Indigenous news? Get the free daily newsletter today.

To get maximum satisfaction from the days to come, feast your eyes on Indigenous News Onlineguide to all hot events.

(Courtesy photo)Dr. Daniel Wildcat (Muscogee / Yuchi) of Haskell Indian Nations University will speak at the 2021 Native American Cultural Celebration: Indigenuity: Building a Bridge to the Future, which will be held virtually October 7-9 and presented by the Museum of Native American history in Bentonville, Ark. (Courtesy photo)2021 Native American Cultural Celebration – Indigenity: Building a Bridge to the Future

WHEN: From Thursday October 7 to Saturday October 9

OR: Native American History Museum (MONAH), 202 SW O St., Bentonville, Ark. and on the MONA Facebook page. Register now here.

Dr. Daniel Wildcat first encountered the word “indigenuity” about 15 years ago in a student article. The clever coat rack merging native people and ingenuity piqued his interest, and Wildcat ran with it.

“I loved that word and really tried to take that idea of ​​indigenous ingenuity, develop it and bring it to life. The big point to remember is (that) our intellectual and cultural traditions are alive. It’s not just about the past. And indigenity is a way to build on this heritage that we have from our ancestors, ”said Wildcat, a professor at Haskell Indian Nations University specializing in indigenous knowledge, technology, environment and education. Indigenous News Online.

(Photo books / Fulcrum)Saving the Planet with Indigenous Knowledge by Dr Daniel Wildcat (Muscogee / Yuchi). (Photo books / Fulcrum)“The heart of indigenousness is taking this ancient wisdom and applying it to solve very contemporary problems,” said Wildcat, who is also the author of the book. “Red Alert: Saving the Planet Using Indigenous Knowledge”.

As for concrete examples of indigenity, Wildcat cites the Indigenous practice of carrying out controlled burns as a means of fighting forest fires, or the process of preserving estuaries by letting nature take its course instead of imposing canals. artificial.

Next week, the watchword will come true when Wildcat and a host of Indigenous people at the top of their fields – from astronauts to artists – come together virtually and in person to share their knowledge during Indigenuity: Building a Bridge to the Future event hosted by the Museum of Native American History (MONAH) in Bentonville, Ark.

Tradition and innovation will blend in workshops, presentations and concerts. Speakers and guests include Muscogee artist and muralist Johnnie Diacon, Dr Robin Wall Kimmerer, author of the bestselling “Braiding Sweetgrass”, and Astronaut Commander John Herrington and Dr Jose Hernandez.

Wildcat will be conducting several interviews during the event. During his discussion with Herrington, “we’re going to talk about how his Chickasaw culture has helped him be a successful aviator and astronaut,” Wildcat said.

Regarding the impact of autochthony on the future of the planet, Wildcat is convinced that indigenous knowledge will play a major role in safeguarding and preserving the environment.

“In the 21st century, if we are to successfully fight climate change, I believe indigenous voices will be the most important voices on this planet,” he said. “This event will let people know that indigenous peoples have a lot of wisdom and knowledge that is very relevant. I think they are already starting to recognize it. Recognizing it is one thing, but they must also respect it. ”

(Photo / American Indian College fonds) The American Indian College Fund to present the Indige-bration concert online on Sunday, October 10 at 6:30 p.m. Indige-bration

WHEN: Sunday, October 10 at 6:30 p.m. MDT

OR: Event page and registration

If you yearn for a Lilith Fair reunion and are also committed to advancing the education of Native Americans, Indige-bration is the premier concert for you.

The American Indian College Fund is combining the power of sound stars with a great cause for a great sparkling music streaming celebration with Jewel, The Indigo Girls and Sarah McLachlan.

The legendary singer-songwriters will be joined by contemporary Indigenous performers including Sicanju Lakota hip hop artist Frank Waln, Samantha Crain (Choctaw) and Martha Redbone (Cherokee / Shawnee / Choctaw), as well as artists from the recording allies with indigenous causes, like Pearl Jam’s Jeff Ament, Portugal.The Man, Mandy Patinkin and Ziggy Marley, to celebrate Indigenous Peoples Day and bring attention to access to higher education in the Indian country.

Indige-bration will also focus on Native American students, who will share stories about the challenges they faced in educational spaces.

For more information on the American Indian College Fund, visit www.collegefund.org.

(Courtesy Indian National Taco Championship)Indian National Taco Championship

WHEN: Saturday, October 2, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

OR: Downtown Pawhuska, OK; Event page

Who is the best taco chef in Indian country?

That tantalizing question will be answered this weekend at the Indian National Taco Championships in Downton Pawhuska, Oklahoma, where the crème de la crème of native cooks will test their taco skills and attempt to outdo any toppings. others.

Visitors can join in the excitement and sample additional tacos by paying $ 5 to become Taco Competition Judges. The winning taco chef will take home $ 1,500, second place will receive $ 1,000 and third place will receive $ 500.

Entertainment and activities including a Pow Wow dance competition, barrel races and a drum competition will round out the tasty celebration, allowing taco lovers to eliminate some of those fried bread and sour cream calories with cultural training.

(Photo / Pueblo Indian Cultural Center)Sky City Buffalo Ram dancers will perform at the Albuquerque International Balloon Fiesta on October 8. (Photo / Indian Pueblo Cultural Center)Albuquerque American Indian Arts Festival / Albuquerque International Balloon Fiesta

WHEN: from Friday October 1 to Sunday October 11

OR: Pueblo Indian Cultural Center, 2401 12th Street NW, Albuquerque, NM; Balloon Fiesta Park, 4401, boul. NE, Albuquerque, New Mexico; Albuquerque American Indian Arts Festival event page, Balloon Fiesta event page

Keep an eye out for the southwestern skies for the debut of Eyahne on the Horizon.

The Indian Pueblo Cultural Center’s new hot air balloon will float over New Mexico during the Albuquerque International Balloon Festival. Eyahne on the Horizon has a matching message and design. Eyahne means ‘blessings’ in the Keres language, and the balloon is decorated with geometric designs depicting gifts from nature and food like clouds, rain, earth, and corn.

In addition to Eyahne’s flight to the horizon, the IPCC is organizing 11 days of events and activities in tandem with and after the Balloon Fiesta.

The IPCC offerings begin with the Albuquerque American Indian Arts Festival on Saturday October 2 and Sunday October 3. With 45 artists, dancing, food and more, it’s a chance for art lovers to shop directly from artists, watch art demonstrations, and mingle with native creatives.

Following the arts festival, the IPCC will feature indigenous dance groups and art and jewelry vendors in the centre’s courtyard, as well as performances at Balloon Fiesta Park throughout the Balloon Fiesta. Featured dance groups include Sky City Buffalo Ram Dancers and White Mountain Apache Crown Dancers.

The festivities end on Monday, October 11 with a celebration of Indigenous Peoples Day featuring dignitaries, Indigenous dances, a historical presentation and artist demonstrations.

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Indigenous perspective. Indigenous voices. Native News.

we launched Indigenous News Online because the mainstream media often overlooks the news that is important, it is aboriginal people. We believe that everyone in the Indian country deserves equal access to news and commentary concerning them, their loved ones and their communities. That’s why the story you just completed was free and we want it to stay that way for all readers. We hope you will consider making a donation to support our efforts so that we can continue to publish more stories that make a difference to Indigenous people, whether they live on or off reserve. Your donation will help us continue to produce quality journalism and raise Indigenous voices. Any contribution of any amount, big or small, gives us a better and stronger future and allows us to remain a force for change. Donate to Native News Online today and support independent Indigenous journalism. Thank you.

About the Author

Tamara Ikenberg

Author: Tamara Ikenberg

Tamara Ikenberg is a Native News Online contributor. It covers the tribes of the southwest as well as native arts, culture and entertainment. She can be reached at [email protected]



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It is not easy to cover the Indian country. Here is why you must. – Poynter https://lumbee-tribe.org/it-is-not-easy-to-cover-the-indian-country-here-is-why-you-must-poynter/ Wed, 22 Sep 2021 17:26:44 +0000 https://lumbee-tribe.org/it-is-not-easy-to-cover-the-indian-country-here-is-why-you-must-poynter/ The Washington State to British Columbia ferry crossing, over three hours of uninterrupted travel, provided the time and luxury to read the Sunday edition of The Globe and Mail. On this day in December 2019, a story about an Aboriginal Metis Family dominated the front page, a description of young parents who had lost custody […]]]>

The Washington State to British Columbia ferry crossing, over three hours of uninterrupted travel, provided the time and luxury to read the Sunday edition of The Globe and Mail. On this day in December 2019, a story about an Aboriginal Metis Family dominated the front page, a description of young parents who had lost custody of their three children – all under the age of 5 – and were trapped in a bureaucracy that had traumatized everyone.

No Exit»Was written and researched by Nancy macdonald, who spent a year interviewing family members and examining Canada’s child welfare system, where Indigenous children are being removed from their families at a rate 10 times greater than non-Indigenous families. The story not only detailed how one system repeatedly fails Indigenous families, but reflected the deeper context and larger crisis in Canada, connecting the dots of a contemporary problem to its roots.

At the heart of the modern context is the century-old heritage of boarding schools, starting with the Indian Act of 1876 and spanning most of the 20th century, when over 150,000 children were kidnapped, many stolen from their homes without the permission of their families or communities. Residential schools were part of the government’s goal of assimilating Indigenous peoples by separating them from their culture, language and histories, as well as the notion that underpinned residential schools in the late 1800s: to save the child, you must kill the indian. These actions are another way of describing the genocide.

The Globe and Mail article patiently described a social structure imposed by governments that let down Indigenous citizens, embodied in this family’s struggles – when things go bad, then good, then bad again – when people go through the ups and downs of love, domestic violence, drugs and prison to get trapped in a formal bureaucracy. The story describes a social system that does not work.

In today’s American news, coverage of Indigenous communities – challenges and strengths – is sporadic, patchy, and barely visible. Consider, for example, mental health, which is not well understood in popular media. Thanks to recent coverage of celebrities such as the Duke and Duchess of Sussex (Harry and Meghan) and tennis champion Naomi Osaka, stories are emerging that help de-stigmatize mental disorders.

This is not the case for aboriginal communities. Suicide occupies an important place in Native America with rates more than 30% more than the general population. Where are the stories that dig into the questions of why American Indians and Alaskan Natives commit suicide? Suicide in Indigenous communities is so underestimated that Censored project Ranked it as one of the most hidden stories of 2020. Invisibility in mainstream media has a disturbing consequence: it becomes a form of erasure.

We believe that there has recently been a greater and welcome importance for reporting on Indigenous communities. But the most engaged and ambitious coverage comes from Indigenous-led news teams and networks, guided by a small but growing group of Indigenous journalists, editors, broadcasters, bloggers, and photographers who increasingly provide insight. Native American perspective to the national conversation.

A simple example is an Indian Country Today story of the herds of North American cicadas ready to emerge from the ground after years of living like nymphs underground. Mary Annette Pember, National Correspondent for Indian Country Today, tells the scientific story but adds one element that may be overlooked in media coverage: How did Indigenous ancestors treat cicadas? The title of his article, “Cicadas: the other white meat”, Answer the question.

Bringing an Indigenous perspective to the storytelling is key to making the stories richer and expanding the scope of reporting beyond the familiar and predominant white male perspective in journalism. The first step is to cultivate an awareness of autochthony while asking yourself: is there an indigenous connection to the issues? Where is the Indigenous voice in a story? What can Indigenous peoples share with news audiences?

Another step is to build bridges between indigenous communities and the mainstream media. Today, such partnerships are gaining ground. The Associated Press created AP StoryShare to facilitate the sharing of Indigenous stories with member news organizations. The Texas Observer and High Country News, among other newsrooms, both have native affairs offices. And our team, Underscore.news, covers Indigenous communities in partnership with Indian Country Today to increase coverage in Oregon and the Pacific Northwest.

There are other practical ways to approach media erasure and encourage reporting that makes Indigenous perspectives more visible. Here’s what we’ve learned so far:

  • Recruit and hire Indigenous journalists and staff. Indigenous writers, editors, and news directors are best positioned to provide a nuanced picture of Indigenous America to news audiences and speak with an authentic voice. Invest time and labor to recruit and hire Indigenous journalists. Write job descriptions that value culture and experience. Enlist newsrooms with Indigenous staff to help find people to join your team.
  • Build trust. That takes time. Meet the Indigenous people where they are. Listen. Add context to your reporting and stories – history, sovereignty, treaty rights – and humanize the stories.
  • Balance the good and the bad. While suicide rates among indigenous peoples could be the history, many communities are creating concrete ways to end this tragic outcome. A solutions journalism approach defines how problems are handled, rather than just describing the problem.
  • Listen. Start from scratch by asking – and listening carefully – to learn more about issues of importance from an Indigenous perspective. Underscore.news is preparing to host listening sessions across Oregon to hear what rural and urban communities want to share. At the same time, we will be checking with those same communities to hear, frankly, how our reports were received. Was it precise, respectful, balanced?
  • Build trusting relationships. Let go of the “us versus them” mentality. Communities don’t like journalists who parachute for a story and then leave. Relationships are long term, which doesn’t preclude covering a difficult or controversial story.
  • Not all stories need to be told. Approach Indigenous people who tell their stories with respect. Journalists should ask permission to share certain stories and ideas. Some Aboriginal stories are appropriate to share; others don’t.
  • Two worlds. To see with two eyes. Many indigenous peoples live in two worlds. Listen to the nuances. The solutions often come in two forms: traditional indigenous paths and western empirical paths.

To build trust, the media must intend to work in a new way – reporting on issues that Indigenous communities tell us need attention. Approaching the relationship with the idea that “we’re in the same boat” is good practice.

At Underscore.news, this simple but vital idea guides our journalism. We’re intentionally recruiting to hire Indigenous staff, and we’re honored to partner with leading national Indigenous news outlet, Indian Country Today, to share an Indigenous beat reporter who covers Indigenous stories in Oregon. Together we are building coverage of the indigenous peoples and communities of the Pacific Northwest.

Underscore’s reporting is based on the values ​​of justice, respect and ethics of journalism. Our goal is to make the mundane Indigenous stories and the people who tell those stories more visible. This new model of Indigenous coverage, we believe, will give voice to those who are not heard and ultimately better describe who we are as a country.

Cynthia-Lou Coleman, PhD, is the author of Environmental Clashes on Native American Land (2020) and a registered citizen of the Osage Nation, and Jackleen de La Harpe is executive director of Underscore.news in Portland, Oregon.

This article was originally published by Underscore.news and is republished here with permission. Underscore.news is supported by grants and individual donations. Please consider making a donation for this important work, which will support their next hire of Indigenous staff and create a stronger and more diverse newsroom as they expand our coverage in the Pacific Northwest.


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Here’s what’s happening in the Indian country: September 10 https://lumbee-tribe.org/heres-whats-happening-in-the-indian-country-september-10/ Thu, 09 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://lumbee-tribe.org/heres-whats-happening-in-the-indian-country-september-10/ Details Through Tamara Ikenberg September 09, 2021 Fashion and cinema are the buzzwords this weekend and next week in the Indian country. Whether it’s an online shopping opportunity for a ready-to-wear piece from an in-demand Indigenous designer, a fluorescent Montana fashion show highlighting women’s health, in From showing off a revenge thriller set on a […]]]>

Fashion and cinema are the buzzwords this weekend and next week in the Indian country.

Whether it’s an online shopping opportunity for a ready-to-wear piece from an in-demand Indigenous designer, a fluorescent Montana fashion show highlighting women’s health, in From showing off a revenge thriller set on a Canadian reserve in Santa Fe, your chances of dressing up with a place to go have never been better.

Take a hot minute to review Indigenous News Online, and mix and match your own style and screen correction.

Launch of the Dakota Oyáte ready-to-wear collection

WHEN: Friday, September 10 at 1 p.m. CST

OR: www.redberrywoman.com.

What do you declare when your ribbon dress is so lavish, rich and majestic that it makes you feel like a modern day native Marie Antoinette?

How about “Let them eat fried bread”.

The punchline and ottoman are provided by Hidatsa, Dakota Sioux and designer Assiniboine Norma Baker -Flying Horse of Woman with red berries.

A dazzling and decadent puff-sleeve ribbon dress is one of seven looks making up the designer’s new Dakota Oyáte collection, which launches this weekend on her website. Flourishing with brightly colored skirts, blouses, dresses and t-shirts incorporating contemporary and native chic, the pieces in the collection are perfect for special events or for everyday dressing.

“This is my first ready-to-wear collection and, although small, it means a lot to me as an Indigenous woman entrepreneur,” said Flying-Horse, who previously focused on tailoring for guests, including attendees at several major awards show, including the Grammy Awards and Academy Awards, as well as Miss Indian World Cheyenne Brady (Sac and Fox, Cheyenne, Tonkawa) and Miss Universe 2015, actress and activist Ashley Callingbull (Calls out).

“Everything I did in (fashion) was just create beautiful clothes and create something that people wanted to wear,” Baker-Flying Horse said. Tribal business news. “It started with one-on-one customers and now it’s all on demand. I have (had) a lot of people who kept asking me to make ready-to-wear because they would like to buy something that is not made to measure.

The impetus for the new collection is rooted in a deep ancestral connection.

“The Dakota Oyáte collection is inspired by my Dakota Sioux lines,” Baker-Flying Horse said in a statement. She added that her collection reflected the influence of her grandmother, the late Beverly Walking Eagle, who was Dakota Sioux and was fluent in the tribal language.

“The teaching she gave me on how to use my Dakota designs is what I apply to my Native Fashions today. It is his talent and his teachings that I want to honor with this collection.

Further demonstrating the designer’s passion for indigenous authenticity and pride, all of the collection’s promotional materials feature model members and residents of the Fort Peck Indian Reservation in Montana.

American Indian Film Institute Presents Special Drive-In Showcase

WHEN: Friday September 10, 7:45 p.m.

OR: Motorama at Downs Santa Fe, 27475 W. Frontage Rd., Santa Fe, NM. Tickets are $ 2-10. To buy here.

In the murderous thriller “Dance Me Outside”, four friends from the Kidabanesee Reservation in Canada find the corpse of an acquaintance and enlist the help of a recently paroled friend in plotting revenge against her killer.

Canadian director Bruce McDonald’s 1994 film will screen this weekend in Santa Fe at a drive-through presented by the American Indian Film Institute (AIFI).

“Dance Me Outside” won an AIFI Eagle Spirit Award and stars Ryan Black, Adam Beach, Jennifer Podemski, Tamara Podemski and Michael Greyeyes, who plays casino CEO Terry Thomas in the Peacock TV hit “Rutherford Falls”.

In addition to the screening, the evening will also include an art and food market, and a short film program organized by AIFI. Doors open at 6.30 p.m. and participants are advised to arrive early for the market.

The 32nd Annual Denver Art Museum Friendship Pow Wow and Cultural Celebration of American Indians will take place Sunday, September 12 at the Denver Indian Center and on the Denver Art Museum Facebook and YouTube pages.  (Facebook page of the event)The 32nd Annual Denver Art Museum Friendship Powwow and Cultural Celebration of American Indians takes place Sunday, September 12 at the Denver Indian Center and on the Denver Art Museum’s Facebook and YouTube pages. (Photo via Facebook)
The 32nd Annual Denver Art Museum Friendship Pow Wow & Celebration of Native American Indians

WHEN: Sunday September 12, 11 am-5pm

OR: Denver Indian Center, 4407 Morrison Rd., Denver, Colorado; The event will also air on the Denver Art Museum Facebook page and Youtube channel.

For a winning combo of camaraderie, competitive dance, food and art, check out the Denver Art Museum’s 32nd Annual Friendship Pow Wow, online or in person.

The event, which celebrates the diverse Indigenous communities of Denver and the Front Range, is free to all.

The grand entrance starts at noon and will be followed by a multitude of dance competitions including jingle, traditional, fantasy and weed, for everyone from toddlers to the golden age. .

For more information visit www.denverartmuseum.org.

'80s-inspired clothing by Navajo designer JG Indie will be showcased during the Honor Our Legacy Fashion Show on Friday, September 17 at the Northern Winz Hotel and Casino in Box Elder, MT.  (Shady Bear Photography)’80s-inspired clothing by Navajo designer JG Indie will be showcased during the Honor Our Legacy Fashion Show on Friday, September 17 at the Northern Winz Hotel and Casino in Box Elder, MT. (Shady Bear Photography)
Honor the Our Legacy Fashion Show and Women’s Health Show

WHEN: Friday, Sep 17, 5 p.m. – 10 p.m.

OR: North Winz Hotel and Casino, 11275 US-87, Box Elder, Montana; Facebook event page

Rocky Boy Reservation’s signature-style showcase returns to the track live and in person, following last year’s all-virtual episode.

The Honor Our Legacy Fashion Show, founded and directed by designer Chippewa Cree Rebekah Jarvey, goes back in time for a spectacular ’80s-themed show complemented by a component on women’s health.

On the fashion front, this year’s star designers are Elias Jade is not afraid (Raven) which has been brought to light several times in Vogue, and whose beaded accessories adorned Home Secretary Deb Haaland in this year’s August issue of InStyle, JG Indie (Navajo) which mixes Aboriginal and urban style, and Mountain sage flower (Ohkay Owingeh, Taos Pueblo, Navajo), whose elegant jewelry and clothing reflects the native landscape and culture of the southwest.

In addition to the parade, presenters from the Rocky Boy Health Center Women’s Health Show will be on hand to offer information on women’s health issues.

“The women’s health show coordinator and I thought combining the health show and the fashion show would be a great way to start coming back to in-person events,” Jarvey said. Indigenous News Online. “Women are the backbone of our families and the pandemic places a lot more stress and pain on them. Having an evening of entertainment and information on women’s health is essential to maintaining the strength of the backbone of our tribe.

The event also includes plenty of opportunities for the non-model community to show off their style in an array of competitions in keeping with the retro theme, including an ’80s Big Hair contest and best dressed’ 80s style.

And as always, the show will have punches from the powwow culture, accented by announcers Russell Standing Rock and Thomas Limberhand, host drum Montana Cree and Color Guard American Legion Post 67.

Grand Valley American Indian Lodge Pow-wow in Riverside Park, Grand Rapids, Michigan (Photo / Levi Rickert)
Grand Valley American Indian Lodge 60th Annual Traditional Pow Wow

WHEN: Saturday September 11 – Grand entry at 1 p.m. and 6.30 p.m. Sunday September 12 – Grand admission at 12 p.m.

OR: Riverside Park, Monroe Avenue NW, Grand Rapids, Michigan.

After being canceled last year due to the Covid-19 pandemic, Grand Valley Indian Lodge is excited about this year’s event which brings dancers from the Great Lakes region to Grand Rapids together. Native American dishes will be available. Face masks are highly recommended.

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Indigenous perspective. Indigenous voices. Native News.

we launched Indigenous News Online because the mainstream media often overlooks the news that is important, it is aboriginal people. We believe that everyone in the Indian country deserves equal access to news and commentary concerning them, their loved ones and their communities. That’s why the story you just completed was free and we want it to stay that way for all readers. We hope you will consider making a donation to support our efforts so that we can continue to publish more stories that make a difference to Indigenous people, whether they live on or off reserve. Your donation will help us continue to produce quality journalism and raise Indigenous voices. Any contribution of any amount, big or small, gives us a better and stronger future and allows us to remain a force for change. Donate to Native News Online today and support independent Indigenous journalism. Thank you.

About the Author

Tamara Ikenberg

Author: Tamara Ikenberg

Tamara Ikenberg is a Native News Online contributor. It covers the tribes of the southwest as well as native arts, culture and entertainment. She can be reached at [email protected]



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Little justice for child victims of sexual abuse in Indian country | Health https://lumbee-tribe.org/little-justice-for-child-victims-of-sexual-abuse-in-indian-country-health/ Fri, 20 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://lumbee-tribe.org/little-justice-for-child-victims-of-sexual-abuse-in-indian-country-health/ (AP) – The convicted child rapist emerged from the tree line without warning, quickly walked past fearful elders, and entered the Navajo house, where his 15-year-old daughter was feeding her pet rabbits. Soon after, the 6-foot-3 man known to be abusive emerged with the girl, promising to return in half an hour. But it was […]]]>

(AP) – The convicted child rapist emerged from the tree line without warning, quickly walked past fearful elders, and entered the Navajo house, where his 15-year-old daughter was feeding her pet rabbits.

Soon after, the 6-foot-3 man known to be abusive emerged with the girl, promising to return in half an hour. But it was a lie. Ozzy Watchman Sr. was abducting his daughter for the second time in six months.

Family members begged the tribal authorities to issue an Amber alert, but it never came.

Almost two weeks passed before Watchman and his daughter were found on June 30 – not by Navajo Police or the FBI, which is investigating such cases, but by a maintenance worker who investigates them. encountered while searching for food.

Child sexual abuse is one of the worst scourges for Indigenous communities in North America, but there is little reliable data on the extent of the problem. Some researchers estimate that it could affect one in two children.

Dr Renée Ornelas, a seasoned pediatric child abuse specialist working in the Navajo Nation – the largest and most populous tribe in the United States – said virtually every family she sees has a history of child sexual abuse.

“They are just little victims everywhere,” she said.

The federal government has been responsible for investigating and prosecuting “major crimes” in the Indian country since 1885. Child sex abuse was added a century later. But it is only in the last decade that the Justice Department has been required to publicly disclose what happened to these investigations – disclosures that suggest that many cases of child sexual abuse are passing. between the stitches of the net.

Howard Center for Investigative Journalism analysis of Department of Justice data shows that the FBI has “administratively shut down” more than 1,900 criminal investigations into child sexual abuse in the Indian country since 2011. Such cases are not. referred to federal prosecutors because, according to the FBI, they do not meet evidentiary or legal requirements. But child sexual abuse investigations accounted for about 30% of all major crimes on reserves closed by the FBI each year – more than any other type of crime, including murder and assault, according to the analysis.

Department of Justice case management data, analyzed by the Howard Center, shows U.S. lawyers filed complaints less than half the time in child sexual abuse cases from the Indian country – about one third less often than they had filed a complaint for other crimes. Only a small percentage of children accused of sexual abuse in the Indian country have been tried. Most cases, such as Watchman’s previous child sexual abuse, have ended in plea negotiations, which usually involve lesser sentences.

“There are a lot more cases of child sexual abuse than what is reported,” said child psychologist Dolores Subia BigFoot, a Caddo Nation citizen who runs Native American programs at the Center on Child Abuse and Neglect. the University of Oklahoma. “There are a lot of cases of child sexual abuse that are not investigated, and there are a lot of cases of child sexual abuse that are not prosecuted. “

LEGAL CUSTODY

The fight against child sexual abuse is difficult everywhere. The crime is often committed by a relative or family friend, which increases the pressure on the victim to remain silent. Physical evidence is scarce and conviction may depend on the testimony of someone barely old enough to describe what happened.

But in the Indian country, the problem is complicated by what a former US lawyer calls a “jurisdictional thicket” of tribal and federal authorities spread over vast swathes of land, making communication and coordination difficult.

Tribal courts are limited by US law in the types of cases they can try. The federal government must intervene when the crime is considered major, such as child sexual abuse, or when it occurs on a reserve and the suspect is not aboriginal. Over the reservations of a handful of states, including Alaska and California, that authority has largely been transferred to the state.

This means that the first authorities on the spot must quickly determine the type and location of the crime as well as the tribal citizenship of the victim and the suspect. If any of these things are involved, the investigations can stop. Crime scenes can turn cold, cases are closed without consequence, and cycles of violence continue.

“I suspect that is the reason why there are so many adults who have this history of child sexual abuse,” said Ornelas, who runs a family rights advocacy center at Tséhootsooí medical center. of Fort Defiance, Arizona, located in the Navajo Nation. “It’s been a problem for a long time. And there are a lot of offenders who reoffend and move on to other children in the family.

Department of Justice guidelines require US lawyers and their prosecuting teams to choose cases most likely to “obtain and maintain a conviction.” But, if not, they have a great deal of latitude in deciding what to accept and what to refuse. Federal prosecutors focus primarily on major fraud and counterterrorism and typically do not prosecute violent crimes, the kind of cases dealt with regularly by local and state prosecutors.

“At the end of the day, they just focus on the cases that are, you know, relatively easier to handle,” said Troy Eid, former US lawyer in Colorado and current president of the Navajo Nation Bar Association. “I think it’s human nature, isn’t it, and that’s how you stay funded.” He also noted that the Indian country does not have much political constituency, compared to the rest of the American population.

Lack of Evidence Most Often Cited for Not Prosecuting Child Sexual Abuse Cases

from Indian country. But it can be a subjective appeal and there is little oversight of cases that are closed or denied, the Howard Center has found.

A former FBI agent, who spoke on condition of not being named, said “there are a lot of cases that have fallen through the cracks” in the Indian country. “I don’t think a lot of people know that,” he said, calling the large number of rejected cases a “dark corner in Indian country”.

A spokesperson for the Department of Justice said prosecutors’ variations were “not a useful measure of outcome in most cases.”

“Child sexual abuse is heinous, illegal and causes lasting damage to young lives,” Wyn Hornbuckle, deputy director of public affairs, said in a statement. “The Department of Justice takes its work in addressing violence in Native American communities, particularly child abuse and victimization, very seriously. We will continue to prioritize these efforts, including working with state, local and tribal law enforcement partners to maximize and coordinate our responses to these questions. “

These often unspoken crimes – some elders believe talking about them creates trouble at home – are part of a continuing legacy of sexual trauma that began with colonization and continued through the residential school days over the years. which thousands of indigenous children were taken from their families in a program of forced cultural assimilation. Chronic alcoholism, poverty and lack of housing – all of which are prevalent on many reserves – are a holdover and contributor to the cycle of child sexual abuse, experts say.

The jurisdiction of tribal courts was expanded slightly in 2013 when the Violence Against Women Act was re-authorized to include non-indigenous domestic abusers. The law did not address sexual crimes against children. A 2021 reauthorization bill gives tribal authorities the right to prosecute non-Indigenous offenders if they sexually abuse a child in tribal territory. But it’s unclear whether this language will survive long-standing concerns in Congress about expanding the power of tribal courts to try and convict non-Indigenous offenders.

“We sometimes forget that the United States has this positive trust obligation to provide public safety or health care or other things to tribal governments and indigenous peoples,” said Trent Shores, former United States district attorney for the district. northern Oklahoma and Choctaw citizen. Nation. “It is something that our founding fathers accepted and enshrined in the treaties. “

“DANGEROUS LOW” WORKFORCE

It took Navajo Police three hours to get to Watchman Farm after the family reported the kidnapping. Such delays are not uncommon. A recent independent assessment by the Navajo Police Department found that “dangerously weak” personnel resulted in slow response times.

The report states that as of October 2020, there were 158 patrollers to cover 27,000 square miles and 173,000 residents. Other issues noted include the lack of internet or cell phone service in parts of the Navajo Nation, which has few actual addresses.

Phillip Francisco, chief of the Navajo Nation Police Department, said the incident involving the girl did not merit an Amber alert because “there was no reason to believe she was in imminent danger or injury serious bodily harm “. He said that it was a “permanent problem” and that the girl “left voluntarily with the father”. Nonetheless, the ministry posted a “missing / in danger” notice on its Facebook page a day after the two disappeared.

Ozzy Watchman Sr. has mentioned wanting to spend Father’s Day fishing at Wheatfields Lake on the Navajo Nation near the Arizona-New Mexico border, his uncle, Leonard Watchman, said.

When he disappeared with the girl on the Friday before the holidays, Leonard Watchman said he told police, but no one seemed to be listening. In the end, this is exactly where the two were spotted.

The girl spent three days, including her 16th birthday, in the hospital. Watchman was arrested and later charged with an earlier assault on the girl’s mother. After the December kidnapping, the girl told a relative that her father had sex with her on several occasions, the parent said. The authorities were informed, but nothing happened.

“The sex offender was taking the girl away and it seems nobody cares,” said Alice Watchman.

In the vacuum between the federal government’s responsibility for major crimes in the Indian country and the judicial authority and limited resources of Native Americans, the tribes are adopting a variety of approaches to healing and justice.

Amber Kanazbah Crotty, one of only three women in the 24-member legislative body of the Navajo Nation, works to revitalize family advocacy centers, which offer forensic interviews and the collection of physical evidence to facilitate prosecution, as well as tips for giving children a chance to tell their stories to promote self-healing.

“At all levels, we have to be responsible (for) what happens to our children,” Crotty said. “I can’t depend on an investigator or a court system to provide or make this whole person.”


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